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Critical Golf: Unbiased Golf Equipment Reviews

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adidas adicross Tour Spikeless

The adidas adicross Tour Spikeless golf shoes immediately caught our eye at the store – are those athletic-style shoes? Or more formal saddle shoes? Turns out they’re a little bit of both. Whether you like the hybrid approach or not is a question of individual taste, but we’re here to tell you that the adicross Tour Spikeless are extremely comfortable on the course. The leather uppers are soft right out of the box, and provide a nice blend of waterproof protection and ease of maintenance.

SCORE
92
GRADE
A-
Design
91
Construction
93
Comfort
92
Value
92

Retail price: $150
Amazon.com: Check price now


91 / A-

DESIGN
The adicross Tour Spikeless has a hybrid look, combining design elements from both blucher/derby dress shoes and athletic shoes. The result is a shoe that provides the flexibility to be worn with either long pants or shorts. No longer do you have to be the guy wearing shorts with leather wingtips, or the dude wearing sneakers with khakis. Time to grow up, my friend, like when the horror on your significant other’s face made you finally realize that Sperry Top-Siders without socks aren’t really acceptable formal attire (we’re not saying this actually happened to us…but it might have).

The adicross Tour Spikeless is offered in either brown/white or white/aluminum. The style is unique, and detractors will argue that it is a jack of all trades but a master of none. We think they provide a handsome look (closest to the Eccos in our tests), and that they provide just the right blend of formality and sportiness. To prove it, we were going to find you pictures of Dustin Johnson wearing the spiked version of the adicross Tour, but strangely all we can find are just his fiancée in order to find that one.


93 / A

CONSTRUCTION AND DURABILITY

adidas adicross Tour

Click for images

The adicross Tour Spikeless features premium, full-grain leather uppers combined with a ripstop nylon saddle. The use of the full-grain leather helps in avoiding the plastic look that plagues shoes made with synthetic materials. The adicross Tour Spikeless is guaranteed to be waterproof for two years. The leather tongue is perforated for breathability, but we experienced no problems with water seepage through several early morning rounds of sloshing through overwatered fairways and rough.

The other benefit of the leather construction is the ease in cleaning up the adicross Tour Spikeless. Dirt wiped right off, and did not stain the white leather. Presumably any scuff marks could be treated with commercially available shoe cleaners.


92 / A-

COMFORT AND ON-COURSE USE
The leather uppers were relatively flexible and the foam insole supplied ample cushioning. As a result, the adicross Tour Spikeless golf shoes were extremely comfortable on the course without any need for a breaking-in period.

The adicross Tour Spikeless weighed in at 1.8 pounds for the pair, and though that technically sets them on the higher end of the range, they still felt relatively light. The shoes had good breathability and kept our feet at comfortable temperatures (although we didn’t try them on any scorching hot days).

Traction is achieved through a “lots of dots/spikes” outsole, with concentrations of larger spikes toward the ball of the foot and the heel. When we say “spikes” here, we don’t mean actual spikes, but rather just pointier plastic/rubber shapes on the sole. Slipping wasn’t a problem during any of our test rounds.


92 / A-

VALUE
The adidas adicross Tour Spikeless have an MSRP of $150, which isn’t cheap. But remember that a single pair of these shoes can supplant the need to buy separate pairs of golf shoes for long pants and shorts, so it’s not such a bad bargain. It’s a good-looking, comfortable pair of shoes – thumbs up from us!


adidas crossflex

The aggressive design of the adidas Crossflex spikeless golf shoe, with its thick midsole and mesh upper, brings to mind traditional running shoes, and it lives up to the comparison. The Crossflex is lightweight, breathable, and phenomenally comfortable. The shoes are grippy on the course, and have the added benefit of being waterproof (but see our caveat in “Construction and Durability” below). Of course a running shoe provides stylistic trade-offs, so these won’t look quite so nice paired with your blue blazer and khakis in the country club dining room.

SCORE
91
GRADE
A-
Design
92
Construction
86
Comfort
95
Value
92

Retail price: $100
Amazon: Check price now


92 / A-

DESIGN
The bold posture of the adidas Crossflex is a departure from the happy-go-lucky look of the first generation of spikeless golf shoes. The Crossflex looks like a running shoe, which shouldn’t be surprising, since it is built on a running shoe last (a “last” is a model of a foot used as part of the shoe manufacturing process, with different lasts used depending on the type of footwear being made).

The Crossflex is offered in eight different color combinations, most of which are a bit outspoken. For example, there’s black/black/slime (a bright neon yellow/green), or chrome/vivid yellow/running white, and vivid red/running white. There are also a couple of combinations with white as the base color, but note that this is an extremely bright white.

Like most running shoes, we found that the shoes paired up best with shorts rather than khakis or other long pants, so you may want something else for your inaugural round at Augusta or Cypress Point.


86 / B

CONSTRUCTION AND DURABILITY

adidas crossflex

Click for images

The uppers of the Crossflex are made of a synthetic mesh, featuring adidas’ Climacool fabric. This helps keep the shoe lightweight and cool. The Crossflex is also guaranteed to be waterproof for two years, which turned out to be important. Our first test pair sloshed through puddles and soggy morning rounds for two months without a hitch, before suddenly deciding to liberally admit water. We took the shoes back to the local retailer, who replaced them without a question. The second pair is now going on a month without issues – we’ll update you if we encounter additional problems.

The other issue we experienced with the Crossflex was in trying to keep it clean. Our first pair was black, so dirt was difficult to notice, but the second pair was white with black and red trim. After tromping through some poorly drained areas, we learned that the white mesh portion of the shoes has an unfortunate tendency to hold mud and dirt stains. We were able to restore the shoes to acceptability using a foaming shoe cleaner, but they no longer have their original sparkling white sheen.

Note that the Crossflex runs on the small side, and adidas recommends ordering up a half size.


95 / A

COMFORT AND ON-COURSE USE
These are absolutely the most comfortable golf shoes we’ve ever worn. They are extremely lightweight (weighing in at 1.4 lbs. as a pair, making them the second lightest pair we tested – Editor’s Note: our review of the FJ SuperLites CT has now pushed the Crossflex down to the third lightest pair in our tests), flexible and nimble, with ample cushioning. On hot days the Crossflex breathes well, and we never felt like our feet were on fire.

adidas claims to use “strategically placed pods and zonal traction elements” to enhance stability. The pods have ridges that provide some grip on the turf, and we have yet to experience any slippage on a swing. Keep in mind that we have yet to use the shoes during actual rain, but we have played many early morning rounds after courses have been soaked by sprinklers.

On one golf trip, we forgot to bring running shoes for the resort gym, and went ahead and used the Crossflex to hit the treadmill for an hour. Try doing that with a pair of metal spiked shoes!


92 / A-

VALUE
The adidas Crossflex have an MSRP of $100, which is a darn good value in our book. The caveats are the aforementioned issues with waterproofing with the first pair and the challenge in keeping the white pair respectably clean. But these shoes are so darn comfortable that we’re able to overlook its faults.


ECCO Street Premiere

The ECCO Street Premiere is the entry “street” shoe in ECCO’s lineup. It offers good looks and quality, though we found them one of the heavier shoes in our tests. The shoes aren’t waterproof, so those who pay in the rains or morning may want to consider other options. They will likely appeal to players desiring a street-shoe look on (and off) the course, and those willing to pay a bit more. Competing spikeless shoes can be found for less, though this is the lower-cost spikeless street shoe from ECCO. We don’t have serious reservations, but if you are considering this shoe we would recommend you also check out the ECCO Street, which adds a few improvements.

SCORE
89
GRADE
B+
Design
91
Construction
92
Comfort
89
Value
89

Retail price: $150
Amazon.com: Check price now


91 / A-

DESIGN

The original ECCO Street Premiere was the first golf shoe we tested that you could legitimately wear to the bar after a round and not look (entirely) like you had just stepped off the course. Indeed, the ECCO Street Premiere (and the ECCO Streets) are described as “street inspired.” We chose the Licorice-Coffee–Fanta color scheme (for those who aren’t in ECCO marketing, this means brown with orange highlights). It has a distressed upper and looks much like any other street shoe, blending in quite nicely off the course. Detailing includes suede at the toe, center (with four Fanta dots) and heel tab. Should you try to wear it to the office and hope that your boss won’t notice? Maybe, but only if he doesn’t play – no reason to arouse suspicion that you are prepping to leave work early to hit the golf course.

There are six different color combinations, all of which have a white midsole with slight color accents, and soles ranging from yellow to a traditional brown. The Street Premiere (and for that matter, the Street) comes with two pairs of shoelaces in different colors…the Fanta-colored laces we received are still in the box.


92 / A-

CONSTRUCTION AND DURABILITY

ECCO Golf Street Premiere ECCO Golf Street Premiere ECCO Golf Street Premiere ECCO Golf Street Premiere ECCO Golf Street Premiere ECCO Golf Street Premiere ECCO Golf Street Premiere

Click for images

We played with the Street Premiere for more than a season, and haven’t experienced any issues with their construction or durability. The shoe unfortunately isn’t waterproof, and as we haven’t spent excessive time in the rain with them (most of our golf is played in Northern California), we can’t attest to how they would wear under wet conditions on a regular basis. From frequent play at Shoreline Golf Links, we can attest that this shoe is goose-crap-proof, however. The insole of the Street Premiere is one the most basic you will find in a golf shoe, with no support or cushioning to speak of. For those who want additional support, the insole is removable and could be replaced by a 3rd party insole (such as one from Superfeet).

Both ECCO models have a standard width throughout and feature the same rubber sole (including the same pattern with rows of circular “spikes” that have additional rubber extending from them at 12, 3, 6 and 9 o’clock to provide additional traction). While we assume that wearing these shoes on pavement or other hard surfaces will result in faster wear, we have kept these on for a reasonable amount of time off the course (although we don’t go so far as to use these as a replacement street shoe or sneaker) and haven’t noticed any troublesome wear to the soles. Both models are well-made and pass ECCO and Critical Golf quality controls.


88 / B+

COMFORT AND ON-COURSE USE

We were initially hesitant about purchasing a pair of spikeless golf shoes, worrying that we would slip while playing (on both dry and wet days). We can honestly say that over the course of the entire season we can’t recall any shot where we slipped as a result of wearing the ECCO Street Premieres. The caveat is that, as mentioned above, we play primarily in Northern California and don’t venture out in the pouring rain. We do, however, play on mornings with dew or frost on the ground, and more than one of our local courses overwaters to the point of having extremely soggy sections of turf. We do try to be mindful of keeping the soles clean, just as we would with spiked shoes.

The Street Premieres weighed 1.8 lbs. for the pair, weighing just a fraction more than the ECCO Street in our tests. At this level they rank as one of the heavier shoes in our tests.

The ECCO Street Premieres are “street inspired”, and having a standard width throughout results in a bit more pressure across the width in the toe box late in the day. While the overall shape of the shoe didn’t fit our feet perfectly, we’ve never regretted the purchase of the ECCO Street Premieres. The Street Premieres were very stable, and we never found ourselves missing spiked shoes.


89 / B+

VALUE

The ECCO Golf Street Premiere retails for $150 (the ECCO Street is a step up at $170, with the extra $20 buying you an upgraded insole, camel leather uppers, and a more breathable lining). We couldn’t feel any difference in midsoles between the ECCO models, nor could we see a benefit of the lining, though we haven’t played in them in 90+ degree conditions. At this price it runs about average within our category, but still a good bit more than the adidas Crossflex and reduced TRUE tour. What we bet swings people to the ECCO Street Premiere are the combination of looks and price point within the ECCO line.


ECCO Street

The ECCO Street is actually the more premium of shoes compared to the ECCO Street Premiere, with the extra cost buying you an upgraded insole, camel leather uppers, and a more breathable lining. It’s on the high side in price within our test, but those who are looking for a street shoe that brings comfort and quality to the course will want to check these out. Maybe you can’t play like Freddy, but you can look like him, right?

SCORE
90
GRADE
A-
Design
91
Construction
92
Comfort
91
Value
86

Retail price: $170
Amazon.com: Check price now


91 / A-

DESIGN

The ECCO Street is a step up from the ECCO Street Premiere (confusing, yes), and is considered a “luxury” golf sneaker. The main design difference between the Street and Street Premiere is the Street features a camel leather upper – think of the leather that will scuff if you run a fingernail lightly across it. At a glance, it isn’t that obvious that the ECCO Street is made for the links – if it had a dark colored midsole (all three color options come with a white midsole and orange sole), one would never think it was a golf shoe. It’s a stylish shoe, and Mrs. Critical Golf has declared it one of the “best looking of the bunch.” Since she’s a veteran of working in the men’s shoe section of a department store, she’s a tough critic. Remind us to tell you about her meltdown at REI when we tried to find her a hiking shoe and everything was deemed “too ugly to purchase.”


92 / A-

CONSTRUCTION AND DURABILITY

ECCO Golf Street ECCO Golf Street ECCO Golf Street

Click for images

Like the ECCO Street Premiere, the Street isn’t waterproof, and while the camel leather doesn’t wear as well as the Street Premieres in the rain, we haven’t spent time in downpours. One of the selling points of the shoe is the insole, so we expect that most purchasers will keep the original as opposed to swapping in a third party insole. The Street insole provides additional cushion toward the back of the foot through the heel, is perforated at the front of the foot (and around the edges toward the heel) to provide additional breathability, and has a lining underneath that is moisture absorbing and anti-bacterial. We had problems with a lingering “aroma” in the ECCO Street Premieres, but are hopeful that the lining of the Streets will keep this from becoming a problem. So far, so good.

Both ECCO models have a standard width throughout and feature the same rubber sole (including the same pattern with rows of circular “spikes” that have additional rubber extending from them at 12, 3, 6 and 9 o’clock to provide additional traction). While we assume that wearing these shoes on pavement or other hard surfaces will result in faster wear, we have kept these on for a reasonable amount of time off the course (although we don’t go so far as to use these as a replacement street shoe or sneaker) and haven’t noticed any troublesome wear to the soles. Both models were well-made and passed ECCO and Critical Golf quality controls.


91 / A-

COMFORT AND ON-COURSE USE

The ECCO Street was our first spikeless golf shoe tested. We were initially hesitant about purchasing a pair of spikeless golf shoes, worrying that we would slip while playing (on both dry and wet days). We can honestly say that over the course of the entire season we can’t recall any shot where we slipped as a result of wearing the ECCO Streets. The caveat is that, as mentioned above, we play primarily in Northern California and don’t venture out in the pouring rain. We do, however, play on mornings with dew or frost on the ground, and more than one of our local courses overwaters to the point of having extremely soggy sections of turf. We do try to be mindful of keeping the soles clean, just as we would with spiked shoes.
The Streets weighed 1.7 lbs. for the pair (as tested), a bit lighter than the ECCO Street Premier, and about average in our tests.

The ECCO Streets are “street inspired”, and having a standard width throughout results in a bit more pressure across the width in the toe box late in the day. While the overall shape of the shoe didn’t fit our feet perfectly, we’ve never regretted the purchase of the ECCO Street Premieres. The Street Premieres were very stable, and we never found ourselves missing spiked shoes. We found the ECCO Streets to be a bit more comfortable than the Street Premieres, which we attribute mostly to the improved insole providing a softer and more comfortable fit, though perhaps the uppers do make a difference as well.


86 / B

VALUE

At $170, the ECCO Street is a step from the ECCO Street Premieres, which are priced at $150 (yes, we agree that this is not intuitive), with the extra $20 buying you an upgraded insole, camel leather uppers, and a more breathable lining. We couldn’t feel any difference in midsoles between the ECCO models, nor could we see a benefit of the lining, though we haven’t played in them in 90+ degree conditions. Many people will buy these shoes just for their ability to blend in while worn off the course, but they offer more than just their looks. The questions is, though, as the highest priced shoe in our tests, is it worth the relatively steep price?


Oakley Cipher 2

Oakley is known for bold designs, and the Oakley Cipher 2 spikeless golf shoe lives up to that reputation. The Cipher 2 is extremely lightweight and waterproof. Comfort, however, didn’t reach our expectations, and the Cipher 2 didn’t grip well in longer grass.

SCORE
88
GRADE
B+
Design
90
Construction
92
Comfort
86
Value
86

Retail price: $150
Amazon.com: Check price now


90 / A-

DESIGN

The Oakley Cipher 2 sits low and practically growls at you. The trademark Oakley “O” appears on the outside of the toe, with snazzy racing stripes running about three quarters the length of the shoe. The prominence of the racing stripes varies depending on the color combination you choose – we purchased a white pair with subtle grey stripes, while there is another white pair with extremely noticeable red stripes.

The Oakley color palette (which oddly enough varies, depending on the retailer) includes black/sliver, grey/yellow, orange/white (for you Tennessee Volunteer fans), charcoal/white, red/white, white/grey, white/black, white/red, and white/gold.


92 / A-

CONSTRUCTION AND DURABILITY

Oakley Cipher 2

Click to enlarge

The upper of the Oakley Cipher 2 is a single piece of “synthetic skin” material. The good news is that it is extremely lightweight and is waterproof. The downside is that in certain lighting, it can have a plastic look. Oakley provides a two-year warranty on the waterproofing, and we had no issues with any leakage in our test rounds.

The synthetic skin is similar to leather in the ease with which it can be cleaned. Dirt and mud can be wiped off and we didn’t experience any problems with staining.

The NanoSpikes used on the outsole for traction (see below) are actually replaceable – a NanoSpike replacement kit can be purchased for a suggested retail price of $20.


86 / B

COMFORT AND ON-COURSE USE

The Oakley Cipher 2s are the lightest shoes we’ve tested, weighing in at 1.2 lbs. for the pair (as tested) [Editor’s Note: with our recent review of the FJ SuperLites CT, the Cipher 2s drop down to being the second lightest among our test group]. The combination of NanoSpikes and midsole made us feel a little lower to the ground, which ostensibly helps with stability.

While the uppers were flexible enough, we experienced some break-in difficulties with the rear of the shoe, which rubbed the back of our ankles raw on the initial test round (we wear no-show socks). Yes indeed, we had to resort to applying Band-Aids the same way Mrs. Critical Golf does with a troublesome pair of high heels. By the second round, this had abated for the most part, but it was a painful introduction to the Cipher 2s.

The shoe doesn’t breathe as well as others we’ve tried – our dogs didn’t feel like they were on fire, but neither were they chilling out in a cool breeze. Oakley touts an antimicrobial treatment to help control odor inside the shoe – thus far we haven’t noticed a real difference.

Oakley has a novel approach toward achieving grip on the course – there are five areas of “NanoSpikes” (tiny nubs that are actually made of metal) on the outsole, which feel almost like sandpaper. The edges of the outsole feature ridges to provide some traction. Depending on the terrain, the NanoSpikes provide differing levels of grip. When you try the Cipher 2s on in a store and stand on carpet, you feel like you are positively glued to the ground (which truthfully is what sucked us into buying a pair in the first place). We didn’t have the same level of confidence on the course in longer grass, and as the rounds progressed, grass and dirt would clump up on the NanoSpike zones and essentially negate any traction they might have provided. The Cipher 2s are probably best suited for play on drier courses that have harder ground and tighter cropped fairways (links golf, anyone?). In addition, make a mental note not to walk on your hardwood floors in the Cipher 2s – we didn’t actually make this mistake, but it sure would be an expensive one.


86 / B

VALUE

The suggested retail price of the Oakley Cipher 2 spikeless golf shoe is $150. If the shoes had delivered on the amazing grip it displays on a golf store carpet, we might be more enthusiastic about the value. The Cipher 2s are extraordinarily lightweight, but didn’t quite provide the comfort level we’d like at this price point.


TRUE tour

If you know of relative newcomer TRUE linkswear, it’s probably due to their relationship with Ryan Moore (he’s part-owner of the company), or simply the unorthodox look of their line of shoes. With their line of “barefoot” shoes, they offer one of not just the most, ahem, unique-looking designs, but also the thinnest outsole in golf, which will allow you to feel the course more than any of its competitors. If you can get past the design of the original shoe, the TRUE tour, you’ll find a shoe that is incredibly light, comfortable, all at a reasonable price.

SCORE
89
GRADE
B+
Design
88
Construction
84
Comfort
92
Value
93

Retail price: $129
Amazon.com: Check price now


88 / B+

DESIGN

TRUE tourTRUE tourTRUE tourTRUE tourTRUE tourTRUE tourTRUE tour

Click for images

The TRUE tour (no, that’s not a typo – for some reason they use all caps for the company name and don’t capitalize the product name) has a shape that makes it look like the golf shoe Bozo the clown might wear, due to the combination of large toe box and the roll/post toe, which is reminiscent of Keen hiking shoes (which, by the way, are among the most comfortable hiking shoes around). Adding to the craziness are some of the color combinations in which the TRUE tour is offered – blue/white/red (we’re all for patriotism, but you’re kidding, right?) and white/red (click on the image to the right to see additional photos of the different color options). We chose white with brown side detail for our pair of TRUE tour shoes. Additional color combinations are white with either black or white accents, black with white accents, or all black (recent updates to the shoe continue to offer even more color choices). With the exception of the clown shoes, the sole matches the center color accents of the shoe.

Even though the shoe looks a bit goofy to us, if you have the game to wear a tie and vest while playing, you can probably pull off wearing this shoe as a fashion statement (Ryan Moore most often wears the TRUE stealth model). But we don’t. The looks don’t stop us from wearing this shoe on the course, but it’s fairly unlikely we’re going to keep the TRUEs on when we hit the local bar on our way home. Mrs. Critical Golf said this shoe “looks horrible.” Much to her dismay, our decision-making process when selecting shoes isn’t based on looks, but rather what we find comfortable. She also asked, after seeing “TRUE” stamped on the left shoe (and not knowing the company name), if the right shoe said “FALSE.” Which, strangely enough, seemed like a logical question. The TRUEs come with two pairs of laces – in our case, white and brown.


84 / B

CONSTRUCTION AND DURABILITY

TRUE tour Product Detail

Click to expand

Our test pair of TRUEs weren’t up to par in construction, with the left shoe featuring some serious puckering of the leather uppers at the toe of the shoe due to very poor stitching. We were somewhat surprised that they made it through TRUE quality control. It doesn’t impact the feel of the shoe, and hasn’t seemed to affect wear, but the build quality of the shoe wasn’t at the level it should be. We returned to the store to swap them for another pair, but unfortunately there weren’t any more in stock in the appropriate size – bummer.
The rubber on the TRUE tour shoe soles will undoubtedly wear faster if you keep them on while off the course, but we don’t expect most purchasers will do so. The rubber soles feel relatively soft, so our guess is that they would wear faster, but we haven’t noticed this to date.

The TRUE sole pattern isn’t a simple grid-like pattern, but rather features square “spikes” at the front of the sole, bars at the edges of the sole and running across the base of the boot, and smaller bars toward the heel of the shoe.

The TRUE tours come with a 1-year waterproof guarantee. In addition, the shoe has “temperature control lining,” though we can’t say that we noticed difference, temperature-wise, versus the other shoes we tested. The tongue is attached to the shoe underneath the insole of the shoe (okay, technically it’s attached to the insole, since what everybody calls an insole is technically called a sockliner…but what are we…shoe nerds?), so it in effect creates a sleeve that you slip your foot into. Comfy!

The TRUEs feel as if they are much more shaped to the foot through the heel and middle of the foot, but with a much wider (and also taller) toe box.


92 / A-

COMFORT AND ON-COURSE USE

TRUE tour Sole

Click to expand

You can tell the TRUE tours are a completely different golf shoe from the get-go, and this holds true throughout the round. As the only golf shoe with no midsole, the TRUE tour puts your feet just a bit closer to the ground. More importantly, the sole becomes extremely flexible – you can pick up a pair and easily twist and bend the shoe in half at the mid-point of the sole (as opposed to only near the toe, which is the case with most other golf shoes). Without the midsole, you’ll feel the course far more than you have with any golf shoe you’ve worn in the past. It’s somewhat an unusual feeling initially…and one we enjoyed. We’re not going to go so far as to say it feels like you are playing barefoot, but it is clear that there is the least amount of material between your foot and the ground of any golf shoe on the market.

We don’t know if we were influenced by TRUE marketing propaganda, er, material, that claimed at the time of purchase that the TRUE tour is the lightest golf shoe worn on the PGA tour, but as soon as we put them on we could tell they were light. The scale backed that up…TRUE tour shoes came in at 1.6 lbs. for the pair, which while when initially released was the lightest tested, now falls average within our test group.

The TRUE tour curls slightly upwards at the toe. This creates a slightly different sensation from most shoes that have a flat insole at the front of the foot, but we found that we didn’t notice this once we started play. We find that the wider toe box keeps the feet more comfortable throughout the round than shoes of more traditional form. And while we expected to have exhausted feet after a round without a midsole to provide support (we don’t spend much time barefoot or in flip-flops), our feet felt fine. They generally are a bit more tired than when we play in other shoes, but we haven’t played with the TRUEs for a full season yet, so perhaps over time our feet will adjust to playing without a midsole. There is a lot of us that is out of shape…and perhaps we need to add the bottom of our feet to the list as well.


93 / A

VALUE

The retail price for the TRUE tour is a fairly reasonable $129 (down from $159). It’s a great buy, particularly since the shoes are waterproof to boot. While we prefer the looks of many of the other shoes we tested, we found the TRUE tours to be more comfortable throughout, both due to the wider toe box and lack of midsole. In the TRUE tour, you’ll feel the course unlike any other golf shoe.